In a previous article, we outlined the new drone registration and accreditation plan coming to Australian drone pilots in the future. Today we were made aware of new requirements that will force all pilots flying commercially to keep flight logs for up to seven years.

Commercial drone flights from October 10th will be required to have a flight log recorded as proof they are complying with the drone safety rules. The logs must be kept for drones that weigh 2 – 150 kg. The small category ranges from 2-25 kg drones while the medium category ranges from 25-150 kg drones.

What it means

Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) can ask for the flight logs at any time. Also, potential buyers of a drone are also able to request to see the logs before buying a drone.

The reason behind the flight logs is a part of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) push to ensure illegal drone flights aren’t as easy to complete as they are right now. The flight logs along with the requirement to register are turning flying drones into what it’s like to drive a car today. You are required to know the road rules, have a license, and keep a service log of the car in case you sell your car to someone else.

These are the following logs the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) require commercial drone pilots to keep of all drone flights.

Operational log

Keep for: 3 years

Applicable to: small and medium RPA

Information to be included:

  • location and height flown
  • type, model, and ID of the RPA
  • dates and time of the operation
  • nature and purpose of the operation
  • weather the drone is safe to be flown the next day

Technical log

Keep for: 7 years

Applicable to: medium RPA

Information to be included:

  • type. model and ID of each RPA
  • the total flight time the RPA has operated
  • in-service times for components
  • timing of next maintenance
  • maintenance drone and certification of any work

Remote pilot log

Keep for: 3 years

Applicable to: medium RPA

Information to be included:

  • accumulated flight time operating an excluded RPA
  • information identifying each operation including the type, model and ID of each RPA
  • date, location and length of each flight

What are your thoughts on the requirement to keep flight logs on all commercial drone flights? Let us know in the comments below.

Photo: NeONBRAND


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