Drones airdrop enemy bugs on harmful insects in crops

drones harmful insects

Uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAV) have been widely used to treat agricultural crops throughout the world, and spray against disease-carrying pests like mosquitos. Now researchers are expanding trial use of drones to control harmful insects by dropping enemy species on them.

Continue Reading

DJI Agras T30 and T10 agriculture drones are now available worldwide

DJI’s agricultural drones, Agras T30 and T10, which were released in China late last year, are now available for purchase in more than 100 countries internationally. In the meantime, DJI has already sold more than 50,000 Agras units across the world this year alone during a phased launch.

Continue Reading

This tiny drone can pollinate crops to help overworked bees

Bees are among the most hardworking creatures on the planet. But in many parts of the world, honeybee colonies are declining so quickly that even the United Nations is worried. About two-thirds of the crops that feed the world rely on pollination by bees and other insects. Without them, we’d be looking at an agricultural doomsday scenario. And this is exactly what a University of Maryland professor wants to avoid – with the help of an army of tiny drones.

Continue Reading

French vineyard revolution: Wine producers use drones to battle grape-rotting mildew

Tech disruption? More like révolution! Tests currently underway using mildew-battling agents seek legal changes allowing drones to spray wine-producing grapes in France’s cherished vineyards.

Continue Reading

NGOs in Kenya using ‘drones for good’ to reverse ecological decline

A leading Kenyan non-governmental organization has teamed up with a group that uses drone and robotics for public benefit in a reforestation effort to turn back one region’s steady environmental decline. Their goal: prepare and plant indigenous trees that have vanished across 2,250 acres of decimated countryside.

Continue Reading

Digital divining rod: New drone tech accurately measures underground water volumes

A Swiss research group has developed a drone-carried sensor that can detect the water content of terrain below, and are offering it as a cheaper and more accurate measurement supplement to existing technology like satellite imagery. Its creators say the device can optimize a variety of terrain management decisions in a world where drought and fires are becoming a major, recurring problem.

Continue Reading